Gram/Panchayat Courts

 

           Under the Punjab Gram Panchayat Act, 1952, certain civil, criminal and revenue powers are vested in the Panchayats.  Petty cases of various categories are disposed of by the Panchayats.  This has been done to decentralize authority to strengthen the roots of democracy and lessen the burden of heavily occupied courts.  The entrusting of judicial powers to the Panchayats are competent to grant bail to an individual against a surety of not exceeding Rs 500.

 

           The criminal jurisdiction of a gram panchayat is confined to the trial of offences specified in Schedules I-A and I-B of the Punjab Gram Panchayat Act, 1952.  The Panchayats are also competent to take congnizance suo moto of cases falling under Sections 160, 228, 264, 277, 289, 290, 294 and 510 of the Indian Penal Code and under Sections 3 and 4 of the Punjab Juvenile Smoking Act, 1918 (or any other Act for the time being in force.).

 

           With regard to the civil and revenue judicial functions, the Panchayats are competent to try suits for recovery of movable property or the value of such property ; suits for money or goods due on contracts or price thereof ; suits for compensation for wrongfully taking or injuring movable property ; and suits mentioned in clauses (j), (k), (l) and (n) of sub-section (3) of Section 77 of the Punjab Tenancy Act, 1887, (or any other Act for the time being in force).  The Panchayat when trying such suits is deemed to be civil or criminal or revenue courts as the case may be.

 

           The following statement shows the Judicial work-done by the Panchayats in the district, during 1970-71 to 1974-75 :-

 

Judicial work done by the Panchayats in the Hoshiarpur District,

 1970-71 to 1974-75

 

 

Revenue Cases

1970-71

1971-72

1972-73

1973-74

1974-75

1.

Cases pending at the beginning of the year

257

248

141

207

201

2.

Cases instituted

268

200

309

289

197

 

Revenue Cases

1970-71

1971-72

1972-73

1973-74

1974-75

3.

Cases received by transfer

 13

 12

  5

 

  6

4.

Cases transferred from Panchayats and cases returned for presentation to Courts and Panchayats

  2

  3

  4

   6

  1

5.

Cases decided

287

255

244

296

    287

6.

(a)  Cases dismissed

 40

 37

 26

  23

     33

 

(b) Cases compounded

198

156

179

255

  234

 

© Cases decreed

 49

 62

  31

 18

   20

7.

Cases pending at the end of the year

248

141

207

201

 116

 

Criminal Cases

 

 

 

 

 

1.

Cases pending at the beginning of the year

553

517

920

1,430

   1,563

2.

Cases instituted

219

837

914

341

  261

3.

Cases received by transfer

 19

 14

   6

 19

   35

4.

Cases transferred from Panchayats for presentation to Courts and Panchayats

 15

 10

  4

 13

  15

5.

Cases decided

254

435

403

414

 367

6.

(a) Cases dismissed

 44

 59

33

 31

 137

 

(b) Cases compounded

170

208

325

328

 199

 

©  Cases convicted

 40

108

 45

 55

   31

7.

Cases pending at the end of the year

517

920

1,430

1,563

1,475

 

(Source : Directorate of Panchayati Raj and Community Development, Punjab, Chandigarh)

 

(e) Bar Associations

 

           Bar Associations at  the district as well as the sub divisional headquarters in the state look after the interest of their members and render useful  service to the cause of legal profession. They endeavour to maintain the dignity of the profession besides promoting cordial relations between the Bench and the Bar.  They also help the courts in the administration of justice and promote a sense of respect for law and order in the public mind.

 

           There are three Bar Associations in the district, one each at Hoshiarpur, Dasuya and Garhshanker.  The Bar Association, Hishiarpur is the oldest one in the district and was formed in about 1889-1890.  Its strength, as on July 31, 1975, was 73.  The Bar Association, Dasuya, was formed in 1920 and it had 41 members, as on March 31, 1975.  The Bar Association, Garhshanker, was formed in about 1940.  Its strength, as on March 31, 1975 was 21.

 

 

CHAPTER XIII

Other Departments

 

(a)

Public Works Department

(b)

Public Relation Department

(c)

Co-operative Department

(d)

Food and Supplies Department

(e)

Finance Department

(f)

Planning Department

(g)

Language Department

(h)

Soil Conservation and Engineering Department

 

 

 

           The role of public administration has been increasingly expanding in recent years to met the exigencies of planning for a Welfare State.  The activities now undertaken by the Government are so diverse and manifold that number of departments, which did not exist or play any significant part in the past, have come up since Independence (1947) to give effect to and keep pace with the growing tempo of work generated by various developmental activities under the Five-Year Plans.

 

           The administrative set-up, functions and activities of the departments, which have not been mentioned elsewhere in the Gazetteer, have dealt with hereunder :

 

(a)  Public Works Department

          

The Public Works Department is one of the important departments of Government as various developmental works are executed through it.  Consequent upon the launching and implementation of development programmes under the Five-Year Plans, it undertakes on behalf of Government, construction and maintenance of major irrigation works, building, bridges and roads inclusive of those required for the defence of the country.  The jurisdiction of the circles/divisions of the department does not necessarily confine to one district, it may extend to more than one district.  The circles/divisions, having jurisdiction over the Hoshiarpur District, are described below :

 

(i)  Superintending Engineer, Hoshiarpur Construction Circle, P. W. D., B & R Branch, Hoshiarpur

 

           Formed in 1972, this circle has five divisions under it, viz.  Provincial division, P. W. D., B & R Branch, Hoshiarpur ; Construction Division, P. W. D., B & R Branch, Hoshiarpur ; Talwara Construction Division, P. W. D., B & R Branch, at Mukerian ; Central works Division, P. W. D., B & R Branch, Hoshiarpur ; and Construction Division, P. W. D., B & R Branch, Nawashahr1, each under an Executive Engineer.

 

           The Superintending Engineer is under the administrative control of the Chief engineer, P. W. D., B & R, Punjab, Patiala.  He is assisted by 1 Circle Head Draftsman, 2 Assistant Draftsmen, 2 Tracers, 1 Superintendent, 1 Head Assistant, 6 Assistants, besides other ministerial/technical Class III and miscellaneous Class IV staff.

 

           The main functions of the circle are to exercise control over the construction of roads and buildings under its jurisdiction.

1.       The description of the Construction Division, P. W. D., B & R Branch.  Nawashahr has been given in chapter XIII, Other Departments’ of the Jullundur District  Gazetteer.

 

Executive Engineer, Provincial Division, P.W.D., B & R Branch, Hoshiarpur.- The division was opened in 1956. the Executive Engineer is assisted by 4  Sub Divisional Engineers,16 Sectional Officers, 1 Head Draftsman, 2 Assistant Draftmen,,2 Tracers, 1 Head Assistant, 3 Assistant, besides other ministerial /technical class III and miscellaneous class IV staff.

 

The main functions of the division are to execute roads and buildings works and to look after their maintenance.

 

Executive Engineer, Construction Division, P.W.D., B & R Branch, Hoshiarpur. - Started in 1972, the division is under the charge of an  Executive Engineer who is assisted by 3  Sub Divisional Engineers,12 Sectional Officers, 1 Head Draftsman, 2 Assistant Draftsmen, 2 Tracers, 1 Head Assistant, 2 Assistant, and other miscellaneous  ministerial  class III and allied class IV staff.

 

The main functions of this division are to construct public buildings and roads bridges financed by the Central Government.

 

Executive Engineer Central Works Division Executive Engineer, Provincial Division, P.W.D., B & R Branch, Hoshiarpur. opened in August 1972, this division has four Subdivisions under it, i. e., three at Hoshiarpur and the fourth at Garhshankar.  The Executive Engineer is assisted by 4 Sub Divisional Engineers, 1 Head Clerk, 1 Divisional Accountant, 1 Head Draftsman, besides other ministerial/technical Class III and miscellaneous Class IV staff.

 

The main functions of the division are to construct roads and bridges financed by the Central Government.

 

(ii) Superintending Engineer, P. W. D., Public Health Circle, Hoshiarpur

 

Formed in 1972, this circle has four divisions under it, viz.  Public Health Division No. 1, Hoshiarpur ; Public Health Division No. 2, Hoshiarpur ; Public Health Division, Dasuya, and Public Health Division mahalpur.

 

The main functions of this department are to execute rural water supply scheme, sewerage schemes and other public health sanitation works in the district.

 

Executive Engineer P. W. D., Public Health Division No. 1, Hoshiarpur.- This division was opened in 1969.  The Executive Engineer is assisted by 4 Sub Divisional Engineers, 16 Sectional officers, 1 Head Clerk, 1 Accountant, 1 Head Draftsman, 2 Assistant Draftsmen, 2 Tracers, besides other ministerial/technical Class III and miscellaneous Class IV staff.

 

Executive Engineer P. W. D., Public Health Division No. 2, Hoshiarpur.-  This Division was opened in 1972.  The Executive Engineer is assisted by 3 Sub Divisional Engineers, 12 Sectional Officers, 2 Assistant Draftsmen, 3 Tracers, 1 Divisional Accountants, 1 Head Clerk, besides other ministerial/technical Class III and miscellaneous Classes IV staff.

 

Executive Engineer P. W. D., Public Health Division, Dasuya. – The division was opened in 1974.  The Executive Engineer is assisted by 3 Sub Divisional Engineers, 12 Sectional Officers, 1 Head Clerk, 1 Head Draftsman, 2 Assistant Draftsmen, 1 Tracer, 1 Accountant, besides other ministerial/technical Class III and miscellaneous Class IV staff.

 

Executive Engineer P. W. D., Public Health Division Mahalpar. – The division was opened in 1972.  The Executive Engineer is assisted by 4 Sub Divisional Engineers, 15 Sectional Officers, 1 Head Draftsman, 2 Assistant Draftsmen, 2 Tracers, 1 Head Clerk besides other ministerial/technical Class III and miscellaneous class IV staff.

 

(iii)  Superintending Engineer, Shah Nehar Circle, Talwara.

 

           Formed in 1972, this circle has three divisions under it, viz.  Shah Nehar Civil Division, Talwara ; Shah Nehar Mechanical Division, Talwara and Shah Nehar Field Division, Talwara, each under an Executive Engineer.

 

           The Superintending Engineer is under the administrative control of the Chief Engineer, Irrigation works, Punjab, Chandigarh.  He is assisted by 1 Circle Head Draftsman, 2 Draftsmen, 1 Superintendent, 1 Head Clerk, besides ministerial/technical Class III and miscellaneous Class IV staff.

 

           The main functions of the circle are to construct a barrage across River Beas about 3 km downstream of Beas Dam near Talwara Township to ensure perennial supply to the existing inundation Shah Nahar Canal through a feeder channel.

 

           Executive Engineer, Shah Nehar Civil Division, Talwara. – This division was opened at Mukerian on January 31, 1973.  It was closed on June 30, 1974 and reopened at Talwara on July 8, 1974.  The Executive Engineer is assisted by 4 Sub Divisional Officers, 1 Assistant Research Officer, 16 Sectional Officers, 1 Head Clerk, 1 Divisional Head Draftsman, 2 Research Assistants, 1 Divisional Accountant, 2 Draftsmen, besides other ministerial/technical Class III and miscellaneous Class IV staff.

 

           All the mechanical work relating to Shah Nehar Project is done under the control of Executive Engineer, Shah Nehar Mechanical Division.

 

           Executive Engineer, Shah Nehar Field Division, Talwara. – Opened on January 1, 1974 at Chandigarh, Shah Nehar field Division was closed on June 3, 1974.  It was reopened at Talwara on June 10, 1974.  The Executive Engineer is assisted by 4 Sub Divisional Officers, 16 Sectional Officers, 1 Head Clerk, 1 Divisional Head Draftsman, 1 Divisional Accountant, 2 Draftsmen, besides other ministerial/technical Class III and miscellaneous Class IV staff.

 

           The Executive Engineer, Shah Nehar Field Division is responsible for attending to field investigation and construction of canal.

 

(iv)  Executive Engineer, Jullundur Drainage Division, Jullundur

 

           Opened in 1947, this division is under the Superintending Engineer, Amritsar Drainage Circle, Amritsar.  Its jurisdiction also extends to the Hoshiarpur District. The drainage Sub Division was set up at Hoshiarpur on August 15, 1971.  It is under a Sub Divisional Officer, who is assisted by 3 Sectional Officers (one each posted at Hoshiarpur, Tanda, and Dasuya), 1 Surveyor, 2 Work Mistries, 6 Mates, 50 Canal patrols, 1 Regulation Beldar, 1 Boatman and 2 Chowkidars.

 

           The main functions of the subdivision are to attend to flood control and drainage works in the Hoshiarpur District.

 

(b)  Public Relations Department

 

           This department is represented in the district by the District Public Relations Officer, who is assisted by 1 Accountant, 1 Information Centre Assistant, 1 Drama Inspector, 1 Stage Master, 5 Actors, 1 Harmonium Master, 1 Table Master, 1 Cinema Operator, 2 Radio Mechanics, 4 Tahsil Publicity Organizers and other ministerial/technical Class III and miscellaneous Class IV staff. This office was established before the partition (1947).

 

           The main function of the District Public Relations Officer are to maintain liaison between Government and Public, to publicize Government policies and programmes through press and mass media of dramas and cinemas and to convey the Government the reactions of the public. He also organises public meetings, rural conferences, Kavi darbars (poetic symposia) exhibitions and variety programmes. Besides, he covers the functions of the Chief Minister, Ministers and other distinguished V. I. Ps. and releases press notes. The office also runs an information centre at the district headquarters. Under the community listening scheme, radio/sets are supplied to different panchayats/schools in the district.

 

 

(c)  Co-operative Department

 

           The department is represented in the district by two Assistant Registrars, Co/operative Societies, one posted at Hoshiarpur and the other at Garhshankar with headquarters at Hoshiarpur. The jurisdiction of the Assistant Registrar, co-operative Societies, Hoshiarpur ext4ends to the Dasuya Tahsil and two blocks of Hoshiarpur Tahsil, viz. Bhunga and Hoshiarpur I and that of the Assistant Registrar, co-operative Societies, Garhshankar at Hoshiarpur to the Garhshankar Tehsil and two blocks, viz. Balachaur and Hoshiarpur II including city (Bajwara block), They are under the administrative control of the Deputy Registrar, co-operative Societies, Rupnagar with an overall control of the Registrar, Co-operative Societies, Punjab, Chandigarh.

           The office of the Assistant Registrar, co-operative Societies, Hoshiarpur, was established in 1925. He is assisted by 15 Inspectors, 44 Sub-Inspectors, 1 Head Clerk, 1 Accountant, 1 Statistical Assistant, besides  other ministerial and Class IV staff.

 

           The office of the Assistant Registrar, Co-operative Societies Garhshankar was established in 1945. It was abolished in 1954 and then reopened in 1955. The Assistant Registrar is assisted by 16 Inspector 33 Sub Inspectors, 1 Head Clerk, 1 Accountant, 1 Statistical Assistant, besides other ministerial and Class IV staff.

 

           The main functions of the Assistant Registrar, co-operative Societies, are; to ensure proper growth and development of the Co-operative movement; registration of co-operative societies and to exercise supervision over them; and to ensure the audit of the accounts of these societies. Besides, they advance loan to the members of the societies for stepping up agricultural production. Loans are also advanced in the form of fertilizers, seeds and agricultural implements.

 

(d)  Food and Supplies Department

 

           The department is represented at the district level by the District Food and Supplies Controller, Hoshiarpur.  He is under the administrative control of theDirector, Food and Supplies, Punjab, Chandigarh.

 

           The office of the District Food and Supplies Controller, Hoshiarpur was established in 1944.  He is assisted by 2 District Food and Supplies Officers, 6 Assistant Food and Supplies Officers, 1 Head Clerk, 1 Senior Auditor, 2 Head Analysts, 5 Junior Analysts, 1 Statistical Assistant, 2 Accountants 9 junior Auditors, 26 Inspectors, besides other ministerial and Class IV staff.

 

           The main functions of the department are : procurement of foodgrains ; distribution of sugar, rice, wheat-flour and vegetable ghee through fair price shops and the branches of co-operative/consumer’s stores in urban as well as rural areas ; issue/renewal of brick-kilns and fire-wood licences allotment of coal/coke and cement ; and checking of licences of foodgrains, rice-hullers, rice-shellers, kerosene, ghee, rice, sugar, yarn, etc.  The department also maintains its own godowns for the storage of foodgrains.

 

(e)  Finance Department

 

           The Finance Department is represented in the district by the Treasury Officer, Hoshiarpur, who is incharge of the district Treasury.  This officer was established about the year 1956.  The District Treasury Officer is assisted by 5 Assistant Treasury Officers (incharge of the Sub-treasuries ‘Dasuya, Mukerian, Talwara, Garhshankar, and balachaur), 1 District Treasurer, 5 Assistant Treasurers, 1 Assistant Superintendent, 10 Assistants, besides ministerial and Class IV staff.

 

           The main functions of Treasury Officer and Assistant Treasury Officers are to make receipts and payments on behalf of the Government ; to maintain the initial accounts of the Government ; and storage of stamps, postal stationery, valuables, etc.  They are also responsible to the Accountant General, Punjab, Chandigarh for the regular submission of monthly accounts and allied returns, etc.

 

(f) Planning Department

 

           The department is represented at the district level by the District Statistical Officer, Hoshiarpur, whose office was established in 1960 . He is assisted by 3 Technical Assistants, 10 Field Assistants, 1 Inspector (National Sample Survey Scheme), 1 Assistant, 1 Clerk and 2 peons.

 

           The main functions of the District Statistical Officer are: to coordinate the statistical of various offices at the district level and to publish statistical data; to  improve the quality of the statistical work done at the district level; to conduct ad hoc socio-economic surveys; to collect price data for supplying to the different Central and State agencies to collect weekly retail prices: and to act as store of statistics for Government institutions and interested public.

 

(g) Languages Department

 

The Languages Department is represented at the district level by the District Languages Officer, Hoshiarpur. He is assisted by an instructor, a Clerk and a Peon. This officer was established in 1962.

 

           The main functions of the District Languages Officer are: to inspect, help and guild the district offices regarding the introduction of official languages, i.e., Punjabi: to hold class for teaching Punjabi/ Hindi to Government employees; to impart training in  Punjabi typewriting and shorthand; to hold  examinations in Punjabi and Hindi  at district level ; to assist the Government offices in translating pamphlets/books in Punjabi; to organize literary seminars, dramas and Kavi  darbars (poetic symposia), etc. The department renders help to collages, schools and panchayats to develop their libraries by providing these institutions with books. This office has also undertaken a linguistic and cultural survey of Dholbaha village in the Hoshiarpur Tahsil.

 

(H) Soil Conservation Department

 

           At the district level , the department is represented by 2 Divisional Soil Conservation Officers, one each posted at Hoshiarpur and Garhshankar. They are under the administrative control of the Chief Conservator of Soils, Punjab, Chandigarh . the Jurisdiction of the Divisional Soil  Conservation Officer, Hoshiarpur extends to Hoshiarpur and Dasuya tahsils and that of the Divisional Soil Consevation Officer, Garhshankar  to Balachaur and Garhshankar tahsils and also Nurpur Bedi Block of Rupnagar District.

 

           The office of the Divisional Soil Conservation Officer, Hoshiarpur was established in 1960 . He is assisted by 2 Assistant, Soil Conservation Officers, 1 Assistant Accounts Officer, 1 Head Clerk, 3 Accountants.10 Agricultural Inspectors, 50 Agricultural Sub- Inspectors/ Supervisors, besides other miscellaneous Class III and Class IV staff.

 

           The Office of the Divisional Soil Conservation Officer, Garhsankar was opened in 1973 in order to accelerate the tempo of soil conservation works in the district . He is assisted by 4 Assistant Soil Conservation Officers, 1 Assistant Accounts Officer, 16 Agricultural Inspectors/ Soil Conservation Inspectors/Section Officers, 64 Agricultural Sub Inspectors/Surveyors, 1 Head Clerk ,1 Accountant , besides miscellaneous Class III and Class IV staff.

 

           The main function of the department are the execution of Land Improvement Scheme which include works for soil conservation, improving of irrigation system by constructing Pukka water channels, laying  underground irrigation system and providing sprinkler irrigation system in the fields of the cultivators. It also undertakes the leveling of land so that proper irrigation can be provided. The field work is got executed by the Assistant Soil Conservation  Officers . 

 

 

          

CHAPTER XIV

LOCAL SELF-GOVERNMENT

 

(a)

Evolution of Local Self Government in the District

(b)

Organization and Structure

(c)

Town Planning and Housing

(d)

Panchayati Raj

 

 

(a)  Evolution of local Self-Government in the District

 

 

           Local Self Government of a district consists of municipal committees, Zila Parishads,  notified and town area committees. These institutions act within the frame work set up by a Stat Government .  These are manned and managed by persons drawn from among the public and are aimed to create harmonious co-ordination in keeping the administration  smooth. In many respects, these instructions are autonomous, but work under the constant vigilance and guidance of a State  Government.

 

           Local Self Government in the Punjab, as in other States of India, is of two kinds; the urban local government and the rural local government .The major units of the urban local government are the municipal committees, where as minor ones are notified area committees. The major units of the rural local government are zila parishad, panchayat samities and gram Panchayats. The development of the local self government in the urban areas is described here whereas that of the rural areas has been discussed under the head ‘Panchayati Raj’.

 

           Historical Retrospect,- The history of local self government in India  dates back to the Vedic age . Effective organisations and institutions, such as panchayats of golden days, were like the present local bodies. The excavations at Harappa and Mohenjodaro (Pakistan) reveal that a highly developed urban civilization existed in the ancient past. The cities had their councils which were elected bodies. though  the existence of the elected city councils in ancient Indian can not be denied, yet there is no doubt that the foundation of the modern system of municipal government  in India was laid by the British, particularly after the transfer of power from the East India Company to the crown in 1858.

 

The earliest Act in the Punjab dealing with municipal administration was the Municipal  Act, 1867, which gave a great fillip to the growth  of the Municipal bodies . This Act was repealed by the Municipal Act , 1873, which aimed at providing for conservancy, local improvements and  education in the towns of the Punjab and for leveling taxes in them .In 1882, Lord Ripon (1880-84) made the historic statement which has since been acclaimed  as the Magna Carta of  the local self government  in India . He realised  the importance of the local self government and made  every effort to develop it as a political and popular  instrument of public administration . He suggested that the principle of election should be introduced and the quantum of official members be reduced. In this way ,he wanted to transfer full powers to the efficiently working popular representatives of the people. He advocated for greater fiscal autonomy and control for the local bodies to make them stronger and more capable of taking decisions.

 

The reforms proposed by Lord Ripon led to the overhauling of the  Act IV of 1873 and  the Punjab Municipal Act, 1884. The latter Act was repealed by the Municipal Act of 1891, which only introduced such  changes as experience had proved to be desirable. The Act of 1884, however , continued to be the  foundation of the municipal  administration in the Punjab.

 

           The Royal Commission on Decentralization, 1909, laid stress on the importance of village panchayats and recommended that that the Government control upon the local self-government should be relaxed.  The Punjab was the first province to incorporate the Royal Commission’s recommendation in a statute.  The Punjab Municipal Act was passed in 1911, which with certain modifications, is still the basis of the Municipal Government in the Punjab.

 

           With the enactment of the Punjab Small Town Act, 1921, all the committees in the Hoshiarpur District, except those of Hoshiarpur and Tanda, Urmar were declared as town committees.  The Act was repealed in 1954 with the passage of the Punjab Municipal (Second Amendment) Act, 1954, and all the committees, with the exception of Hoshiarpur and Tanda Umar, were Class II municipal committees.  Hoshiarpur and Tanda Umar were Class II municipal committees from their very inception and Hoshiarpur Municipal Committee was converted into Class I in 1951.  Small town committees were also formed at Jaijon, Miani and Khanpur in 1924.  These were abolished in 1952-53 (Jaijon) and in 1957-58) (Miani and Khanpur), respectively.

 

Before the independence of the country in 1947 the changes introduced in the Punjab Municipal Act, 1911, by a series of amending Acts, were relatively of a minor character.  After the independence, the Government adhered to the policy of decentralization of administration and development of the village panchayats.  Reforms in the above fields were carried out.  The control of the people over the local bodies was encouraged and greater powers were granted to enable them to function effectively. The zila parishads were vested with greater powers.  Various legislations have been made to regulate the functions, powers and responsibilities of the local bodies.  New election rules have been framed to provide for elections on the basis of universal adult franchise.  Provision has also been made for the reservation of seats for the members of the Scheduled Caste.  Greater financial resources have been created for the expansion of the local bodies.

 

Under the Punjab Municipal (Amendment) Act, 1956, reservation has been provided for Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes and Backward Classes in the services of municipal committees.

 

Previously the term of office of municipal commissioners in the State was three years.  This term was extended to five years under the Punjab Act No. 38, of 1973, Section 13 (2).

 

 

 

(b)  Organisation and Structure

 

           Functions and Duties of Municipal Committees. – Statutorily, the Punjab municipal bodies have two types of functions, namely, obligatory functions and optional functions.  Obligatory functions are those functions which every municipal committee has to perform and if for performing them, a committee does not make sufficient provision in its budget, the State Government compels it to do so ; and if the committee fails to perform these functions satisfactorily, then the State Government may even supersede the committee and place the municipality under the charge of its own officer.  Obligatory functions are of four main types, viz. public safety and convenience,  medical relief, public works and public health.  These functions include such activities as regulating or preventing the abetment of offensive or dangerous trades, removing obstructions and projections in public streets, lighting and cleaning public streets, extinguishing of fires, making provision for and regulating of slaughter-houses, maintaining burial and cremation grounds, latrines, picnic spots, drains and sewers, registering births and deaths, making arrangements for public vaccination, inoculation, primary education, etc.

 

           The list of optional functions is comprehensive and includes constructing and maintaining public streets, public streets, public parks, gardens, libraries, museums, dharmshalas, rest-houses, lunatic asylums ; furthering educational programmes other then primary education ; planting and maintaining of roadside trees, destruction of stray dogs, maintaining dairy farms, breeding studs, holding of fairs, exhibitions, etc.

 

           There are 8 municipalities in the district at Dasuya, Garhdiwala, Garhshankar, Hariana, Hoshiarpur,  Mukerian, Sham Chaurasi and Tanda Urmar.  Out of these municipalities, 1 is Class I, 3 are Class II and 4 are Class III.  The income and expenditure of each municipality are given in Appendix at the end of this chapter.  The sources of income of the different municipalities include house tax, octroi and toll, water rate, cinema show-tax, slaughter house-tax, tehbazari fee, licence fee on articles of food and drink, dangerous and offensive trades licence fee, carts and vehicle licence fee, building application fee, etc.

 

           A brief account of each municipality is given below :

 

Dasuya Municipality

 

           The municipality was first constituted in 1867.  After sometime, it was converted into a notified area committee and in 1921, it became a small town committee.  It was reconstituted into a Class III municipality in 1955 and was raised to a Class II municipality in 1970.  In 1974-75, it had 13 members.

 

           According to the 1971 Census, the area of the town within the municipal limits was 1.68 sq. km. and its population was 10,363 persons.

 

           The civic amenities provided by the municipality include street-lighting and arrangements for the cleanliness of the town and the disposal of refuse.  It maintains a library and a reading-room.  It also maintains 3.67 km of roads within the municipal limits.

 

Garhdiwala Municipality

 

           The municipality was also first constituted in 1867.  Some time after 1901, it was converted into a notified area committee, and again in 1924 into a small town committee.  It was again converted into a Class III municipality in 1955.  In 1974-75, the municipality had 11 members.

 

           The area of the town within the municipality limits, according to the 1971 Census, was 0.62 sq. km. and its population was 3,753 persons.

 

           The civic amenities provided by the municipality include street-lighting, arrangements for the cleanliness of the town and the disposal of refuse.  The municipality maintains a library and a reading-room.  It also maintains 10 km of roads.

 

Hariana Municipality

 

           The municipality was first constituted in 1867, but was declared a small town committee in 1924.  It has been functioning as a Class III municipality since 1955.  In 1974-75, it had 12 members. 

 

           According to the 1971 Census, the area of the town within the municipal limits was 1.29 sq. km. and its population was 4,641 persons.

 

           The civic amenities provided by the municipality include street lighting, arrangements for the cleanliness of the town and the disposal of refuse.  The municipality also maintains a library.

 

Hoshiarpur Municipality

 

           The municipality was first constituted in 1867.  It was brought under the Municipal Act, 1884, as a Class II municipality.  It was raised to a Class I municipality in 1951 under the Punjab Municipal Act, 1911.  The municipality was superseded in 1973 and an administrator was appointed by the Punjab Government to look after its affairs.

 

           According to the 1971 Census, the area of the town within the municipal limits was 10.13 sq. km. and its population was 57,691 persons.

 

           The civic amenities provided by the municipality include water-supply, street-lighting, surface drains and arrangements for the cleanliness of the town and the disposal of refuse.  The night-soil is generally disposed of by headloads and wheel-barrows.  It maintains a library and five reading-rooms, an allopathic dispensary, an Ayurvedic dispensary and five public parks.  The municipality has a well organised fire-fighting service. The water-supply scheme was introduced in 1959, but water was actually made available in 1965.  For supplying water regularly, the municipality maintains 10 tube-wells.  The sewerage schemes were taken up in 1958 and upto March 31, 1975, an expenditure of Rs 24,96,737 was incurred on it.  The municipality maintains ‘Shiv Puri’ (cremation-ground).  It also maintains 54 km of roads within the municipal limits.

 

Mukerian Municipality

 

           The municipality was constituted in 1867 and some time after that, it was converted into a notified area committee.  It was converted into a small town committee in 1924 and was made a Class III municipality in 1955.  It was raised to a Class II municipality in 1970.

 

           According to the 1971 Census, the area of the town within the municipal limits was 2.59  sq. km. and its population was 10,937 persons.  The municipal committee had 13 members in 1974-75.

 

           The civic amenities provided by the municipality include street-lighting, arrangements for the cleanliness of the town and the disposal of refuse.  The municipality maintains a library-cum-reading-room.  It also maintains 13.50 km of roads within the municipal area.

 

Sham Chaurasi Municipality

 

           The municipality was first constituted in 1928. It was converted into  a class III municipality in 1955. In 1974-75, it had 11 members.

 

           According to the 1971 Census, the area of the town within the municipal limits was 0.18 sq. Km. and its population was 2,468 persons.

 

           The civic amenities provided by the municipality include arrangements for cleanliness of the town and the disposal of refuse. It also maintains 2 km. of roads within the municipal area.

 

Tanda Urmar Municipality

          

           The municipality was first constituted in 1867 and was reconstituted in 1884 as a class II municipal committee. In 1974-75. it had 16 members.

 

           According to the 1971 Census, the area of the town within the municipal limits was 12.95 sq. km. and its population was 12,262. persons.

 

           The amenities provided by the municipality include street-lighting, arrangements for the cleanliness of the town and the disposal of refuse and the maintenance of intramural drains. It was maintains 11.82 km of roads within the municipal limits.

 

           The municipality also makes annual contribution of Rs. 100 to Pingalwara  and Rs.123 to the Mental Hospital at Amritsar.

 

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